1. The U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-E entered the Briar Patch pursued by two Son'a vessels.   2. The Enterprise drew in the metreon gas that was present in the Briar Patch through the Bussard ramscoops at the front of the ship's nacelles.
3. The metreon gas vented from the ramscoop formed a cloud between the Enterprise and the pursuing enemy vessels. One of the Son'a battleships fired at the Enterprise through the cloud of metreon gas.   4. Once the Enterprise had vented all the metreon gas, it was free to move out of the Briar Patch and contact Starfleet Command. The cloud of metreon gas between the Son'a battleships and the Enterprise ignited.
 

 

 

  

Commander William Riker found himself in a difficult position in 2375 during a hostile encounter with superior Son'a forces in the hazardous Briar Patch.

Riker was in command of the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-E after Captain Picard had remained behind of the Ba'ku world to help its population resist forced relocation. Riker was on his way to inform the Federation Council of the threat posed to the Ba'ku when he was intercepted by two Son'a ships. The Son'a fired on the Enterprise, and also created a subspace team in the surrounding space using isolytic weaponry that had been banned under the Second Khitomer Accord.

The only way the Enterprise could be saved was by ejecting the warp core, which was attracting the subspace tear like a magnet. Riker was left stranded in the Briar Patch with only impulse engines and failing shields.



No more running

Fortunately, Riker noticed highly volatile pockets of metreon gas near the ship, and ordered that the Bussard ramscoop be deployed to collect it with the intention of "[shoving] it down the Son'a's throats."

Riker placed the ship on manual control and navigated the ship via a joystick. He ordered that the metreon gas be vented towards the Son'a and when the Son'a fired it ignited the gas, catching the Son'a ships in the explosion. Riker's impressive display of tactical awareness led Geordi La Forge to label his actions as the 'Riker Maneuver.'